Skip to content ↓

Key Stage 4

Art 

KS4 GCSE Art and Design: Photography, Art and Textiles

Board: OCR

Coursework (1 unit)    60%

Exam    (1 unit)   40%

Why OCR GCSE Art and Design. Let us put you in the picture.

If you’re weighing up your GCSE options at the moment, take a minute to consider just what you might gain if you choose our Art and Design: Photography, Textiles or Art

What’s in it for me?

This GCSE is designed to bring Art and Design to life and to help you develop your artistic skills and expand your creativity, imagination and independence. What’s more, the possibilities for personal expression are endless.

How could it help with my future?

The course provides outstanding preparation for progression to A Level in Art and Design. It could lead towards a career in fine art, new media, games development or games technologies, as well as digital photography and video, and more.

What are some of the things I’ll learn?

We want this to be an inspiring GCSE that will encourage you to consider a wide range of approaches to expressing yourself through different materials, media and techniques.

It will help you gain knowledge and understanding of art, craft, design, media and technologies today and in the past, as well as in different societies and cultures. You’ll also develop an understanding of the different roles, audiences and consumers for art, craft and design. You’ll experience different work practices and look at relevant processes and equipment too.

Candidates should demonstrate an expressive and/or interpretative artistic response to the visual world. They should show understanding of conventions and genres such as portrait, landscape and movement and a range of techniques appropriate to the chosen specialism of photography, Textiles or Fine Art.

How will my work be assessed?

This GCSE has a controlled assessment unit, which will involve you in producing a portfolio of work. Controlled assessment means coursework you do in a supervised environment – which could be in your classroom or, for example, on a field trip. There’ll also be a ten-hour practical task prior to which you’ll have approximately 8 weeks preparation time. This is your examination unit which is worth 40% of your overall GCSE.

What grade will I achieve?

You will achieve a grade for each unit, from 1-9 and then an overall grade for the whole course, which will be from 1-9.

In order to succeed in the course, the completion of quality homework tasks is imperative and students are expected to meet the given deadlines. Students will be responsible for keeping their sketch books safe and up to date as they will contain the majority of evidence for assessment.

All students are strongly advised to regularly attend after school sessions to help support and enhance their achievement.

Business Studies  

“The Vision of our department is based on our Habits of Success. We teach our students to take responsible risks, to show persistence and communicate with clarity and precision when we work with business data and research.”

“The mission of the Business Department is to develop students’ knowledge, skills and understanding in a real world context, preparing students for the work place and life experiences”.

At The Thomas Aveling School, the Business Department will achieve the above aims through a variety of theoretical and practical activities. These will include the use of information technology as a tool for learning, contact with local businesses, establishing vocational links and the effective use of business simulation tasks. We have worked with several national companies over the last two years, such as Jaguar Land Rover, Land Securities plc, McCanns Healthcare Advertising and The Merlin Entertainment Group.

We offer a range of courses to suit students who wish to prepare for further/higher education in the filed of business and management. Courses also develop students’ entrepreneurial skills that can be applied and the workplace. We offer:

  • NCFE VCerts Level 2 in Business equivalent to at least 1 GCSE grade (5 units)

BTEC National Level 3 in Business equivalent to 1 or 2 A levels, depending on students selecting the single (4 units) or double (8 units) award.

We use a variety of assessment methods and we focus on assessment for learning with regular target setting and peer/self-assessment. Skills and knowledge are developed through role play, videos using modern programs and green screen technology, formal presentations and portfolio work. Some of our student work is submitted in video and audio format for the exam board, through business competitions, presentations and visits to companies, as well as regular coursework assignments and exams. Enterprise education is also built into schemes of work and lesson planning. Our students achieve better than national averages in BTEC and compare extremely well to other business students across the country.

Key Stage 4 topics include: Introduction to Business and Enterprise, Marketing for Business and Enterprise, Finance for Business and Enterprise and Plan, Develop and Participate in a Business Enterprise or Project.

NCFE Level 2 certificate in Business and Enterprise

Citizenship 
 

The main aim of the PSHE programme across the school is to raise students’ confidence and help them to develop interpersonal skills, social skills and communication skills in preparation for adult life.

Students will cover a variety of important and sensitive topics across KS3, KS4 and KS5.
E.g. drugs and alcohol; personal health; sex and relationships; personal safety; study skills; personal finance; careers and citizenship. Sometimes the topics are revisited across the Key Stages but looking at different aspects and at a deeper or more detailed level.

Students are encouraged to form and then share their views and opinions by participating in group and class discussions. They are also provided with a range of factual information within their lessons and by outside providers so that they can eventually make informed decisions for themselves.

Wherever possible students are involved in learning actively.

Dance  

Students will study the AQA Dance specification. They will develop performance skills as well as technical skills, expressive skills and knowledge and understanding of Dance through performance, choreography and critical appreciation of Dance. GCSE Dance will increase students’ confidence, self-esteem as well as allowing them to employ the skills of problem solving and creativity. Students cover two units across the duration of the course, component 1, performance and choreography and component 2, critical engagement. Student learn to make knowledgeable decisions and the opportunity to actively and physically demonstrate their ability through practical assessments.

Component 1 – Performance and choreography

(60% of GCSE, internally marked and externally moderated)

  • Set phrases through a solo performance (one minute in duration) (15 Marks)
  • Duet/Trio performance (three and a half minutes in duration) (25 Marks)
  • Solo or group choreography (solo two and a half minutes in duration or group three and a half minutes in duration)

Component 2 – Dance Appreciation

(40% of GCSE, written exam)

  • Knowledge and understanding of choreographic process and performance skills.
  • Critical appreciation of own work
  • Critical appreciation of professional works from the GCSE Dance anthology.

Year 9

Students will work on individual skills in choreography performance to develop and improve them as a dancer. They will also learn skills in critical appreciation to support them in component 2

Year 10

Students will complete component 1: performance and record live ready for external moderation. This will gain more experience and development in the fields of choreography and performance. Students will also learn skills in critical appreciation to support them in component 2.

Year 11

Students will complete component 1: choreography and record live ready for external moderation. Students will also complete component 2.

Design Technology 

GCSE Design and Technology will prepare students to participate confidently and successfully in an increasingly technological world. Students will gain awareness and learn from wider influences on Design and Technology including historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic factors. Students will get the opportunity to work creatively when designing and making and apply technical and practical expertise.

RM Year 10-11

 

Resistant Materials Exam Board – AQA (specification no. 4560)

Controlled Assessment 60%  Written Exam 40%

 

Controlled Assessment project 

40 hours total / 20 hours practical (90marks)

Investigating the design opportunity (8 marks)

Development of design proposals (including modelling) (32 marks)

Making (32 marks)

Testing and Evaluation (12 marks)

Communication (6 marks)

 

Mock Exam paper will be sat in December 2017

 

Written Paper will consist of one single tiered written 2hr paper (120 marks total). Which students will sit in May or June 2018.

 

Consists of 2 sections:

A - design questions               30 marks

B - all specification content    90 marks

              

Design & Technology controlled assessment deadlines:          

Set throughout June, July, September, October & November 2017

 

Final Making Deadline: October 2017

Draft deadline:         December 2017

Final deadline:         January 2018

 

 

 

Product Design Year 9

The GCSE allows students to study core technical and designing and making principles, including a broad range of design processes, materials techniques and equipment. They will also have the opportunity to study specialist technical principles in greater depth.

Assessments

Paper 1

What's assessed

  • Core technical principles
  • Specialist technical principles

    Designing and making principles

    Questions

    Section A – Core technical principles (20 marks)

    A mixture of multiple choice and short answer questions assessing a breadth of technical knowledge and understanding.

    Section B – Specialist technical principles (30 marks)

    Several short answer questions (2–5 marks) and one extended response to assess a more in depth knowledge of technical principles.

    Section C – Designing and making principles (50 marks)

    A mixture of short answer and extended response questions

    Non-exam assessment (NEA)

What's assessed

Practical application of:

  • Core technical principles
  • Specialist technical principles
  • Designing and making principles

How it's assessed

  • Non-exam assessment (NEA): 30–35 hours approximately
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of GCSE

Task(s)

  • Substantial design and make task
  • Assessment criteria:
    • Identifying and investigating design possibilities
    • Producing a design brief and specification
    • Generating design ideas
    • Developing design ideas
    • Realising design ideas
    • Analysing & evaluating
  • In the spirit of the iterative design process, the above should be awarded holistically where they take place and not in a linear manner.
  • Contextual challenges to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission of the NEA.
  • Students will produce a prototype and a portfolio of evidence.
  • Work will be marked by teachers and moderated by AQA.

Drama / Performance Arts
 

In KS4 students will sit the BTEC Level 2 Tech award in Performing Arts (Acting). This vocational qualification is the equivalent of 1 GCSE. Year 9 is used as a skills building year to fully develop and prepare students for the course, whilst in years 10 and 11 students will complete all coursework and assessments in order to achieve the qualification. The coursework for all components may be presented in different forms such as: performances, portfolios and presentations, all coursework will be assessed by internal and external moderators.

Year 9

Term 1: “Don’t you ever!” – ~Students will look at creating polished and more professional looking performance work by eradicating the immature and sloppy habits that they may have gotten into in KS3. Students will also begin to develop their evaluation and analytical skills.

Term 2: “Advanced strategies” – Students will develop their understanding and performance of Explorative Strategies to explore/develop characters and storylines. Students will also continue to improve their evaluation and analytical skills.

Term 3: “Mediums and Elements” – Students learn about the mediums and elements of Drama and how the use of these can make their performance work even more creative and interesting. Students will continue to improve their evaluation and analytical skills.

Term 4: “Monologues” – Students learn about what a monologue is, why they are used, what makes a good and bad monologue and then will learn and present a monologue for performance on their own.

Term 5: “Box project” – Students will learn about the devising process and will explore a range of stimuli to devise a play of their own on a given theme. Students will then be expected to write a full evaluation that gives justification for their comments.

Term 2: “Scripted Work” – Students will read and explore a play text. They will analyse the text and explore using practical rehearsal strategies. They will then be expected to perform and extract from the text in small groups. Students will be expected to write a full evaluation that gives justification for their comments.

Year 10

Students will complete both components 1 and 2 simultaneously over the course of year 10.

Component 1 – Exploring the Performing Arts – 30% internally marked, externally moderated

Students will develop their understanding of the performing arts by examining practitioners’ work and the processes used to create performances. Students will develop an understanding of what it means to be a performer across multiple disciplines and how different performance disciplines approach performance work.

Component 2 – Developing Skills and Techniques in the Performing Arts - 30% internally marked, externally moderated

Students will develop their performing arts skills and techniques through the reproduction of acting repertoire. Students will be required to explore a play text using techniques learned from practitioners’ methods in component 1. Students will also be expected to evaluate the development of their acting skills across the component and to fully evaluate their performance.

Year 11

Component 3 Performing to a Brief – 40% externally marked

Students will be given the opportunity to work as part of a group to create a workshop performance in response to a given brief and stimulus. The examination board will set a new theme/stimulus each year and students will devise their work based on these, creating developed storylines and characters. Students will also be expected to document and evaluate their process and final product.

English  

We currently follow the AQA GCSE syllabus and all students study both GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature.

Year 9

Year 9 is a transition year for us where we build on the skills learned in KS3 and begin to prepare for our GCSE paths. In Year 9 we introduce students to two of their key literature texts: ‘Macbeth’ by William Shakespeare and ‘The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’ by Robert Louis Stevenson. Students will also study a range of poems and look at non-fiction texts and different styles of writing.

Year 10

In Year 10 we study another of the set literature texts: ‘An Inspector Calls’ by JB Priestley. Students will also engage in more detail with the format of the GCSE exams and develop their analytical, evaluative and comparative skills by studying a range of non-fiction texts alongside 19th Century literature extracts. Students will also complete a separately endorsed Speaking and Listening Unit which is a requirement of the GCSE course.

Year 11

In Year 11 students will revise all their set literature texts as well as completing their study of the English Language course. Students will complete two sets of internal mock exams in preparation for the external exams at the end of Year 11.

Food Preparation 

There are several reasons why learning Food at GCSE makes a difference to your education and the opportunities you will have in your life.

  • Exciting and contemporary – It’s designed to motivate students to develop the high level of knowledge, understanding and skills to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating.
  • Keeps the subject meaningful – Students learn about improving lives through better knowledge of food, where it comes from and how it affects our bodies.
  • Inspiration from around the world – Explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions (traditional British and international) to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes.
  • Skills for the future – Progression into higher education through general or vocational qualifications and into a career.
  • Support and guidance – We provide highly practical support to help you at every stage of the introduction of this new specification.

How it's assessed

15% NEA task 1

35% NEA Task 2

50% External written exam

  • Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes (100 marks)

Questions

  • Multiple choice questions (20 marks)

Five questions each with a number of sub questions (80 marks)

Task 1: Food investigation (30 marks)

Students' understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients.

Practical investigations are a compulsory element of this NEA task

Task 2: Food preparation assessment (70 marks)

Students' knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task.

Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved.

How it's assessed

  • Task 1: Written or electronic report (1,500–2,000 words) including photographic evidence of the practical investigation.

Task 2: Written or electronic portfolio including photographic evidence. Photographic evidence of the three final dishes must be included.

What grade will I achieve?

You will achieve a grade for each unit, from 1-9 and then an overall grade for the whole course, which will be from 1-9.

In order to succeed in the course, the regular completion of practical work is essential as well as the completion of quality homework tasks is imperative and students are expected to meet the given deadlines. Students will be responsible for keeping their folders safe and up to date as they will contain the subject knowledge being tested in the final exam.

All students are strongly advised to regularly attend after school sessions to help support and enhance their achievement.

Careers

New product development

This is the ‘lifeblood’ of the industry. Product development is a team-based activity involving developmental chefs, food scientists, nutritionists, marketing people to conduct consumer research, technologists to design the production lines, and packaging designers.

Quality management

Quality managers monitor the quality and safety of food ingredients and food products while they are made and transported. They include laboratory staff, microbiologists, hygiene managers and quality controllers.

Environmental health

Environmental health officers (EHOs) are employed by local councils to inspect food factories, shops, restaurants and catering outlets to ensure that food standards and hygiene are maintained. Local councils usually recruit trainee EHOs with A-levels. Look up environmental health on your local council website.

Buying

Supermarket chains employ buyers to visit food producers as part of their quality control. Buyers have experience in a particular area of food technology and work closely with food producers to develop new products and new food ranges. Some buyers get to travel, perhaps visiting salmon producers in Canada or spice manufacturers in the Far East.

Nutrition

Nutritionists are usually graduates with a wide knowledge of healthy eating and diet-related issues, such as obesity, heart disease and coeliac disease. Many are employed by health authorities, clinics and government agencies, but companies also employ their own nutritionists to give advice on healthy food production and to their customers.

Food research

Government research agencies carry out research to ensure good nutrition and food safety, and as part of a European team monitoring food quality. Careers in food research require scientific knowledge and skills at all levels, including laboratory assistants and technical officers. The research agencies have libraries and so also need librarians and information researchers.

As well as a range of careers in the hospitality industry.

French 
 

       

There are several reasons why learning a language at GCSE makes a difference to your education and the opportunities you will have in your life. Here you can find ten:

  • It enhances your career opportunities in many fields (trade and commerce, design, journalism, tourism, fashion, arts, education, telecommunications) and increases your salary potential.
  • It increases your appreciation of other people and their cultures.
  • It develops your critical and creative thinking skills.
  • Knowing another language significantly improves your vocabulary, grammar and spelling in English.
  • It gives an extra edge to your education, opening your door to art, music, dance, fashion, cuisine and cinema.
  • It significantly improves your chances of being accepted to a good university.
  • It enhances your travelling experiences to Italy, France, Spain, Canada, the Caribbean. South & Central America and Africa.
  • It opens up an entire world of sporting events to enthusiasts.
  • It makes you more successful in picking up other additional languages.

    Visit the following site for more inspiration, advice and activities on the value of learning languages: http://www.languageswork.org.uk.

    The course is over three years during which students will develop the four skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening. It is assessed as follows:

    Current Year 11 for Academic Year 2016 -17:

    30% for the Speaking as a controlled assessment
    30% for the Writing as a controlled assessment
    20% for the Reading as an exam paper – May/June in Year 11
    20% for the Listening as an exam paper – May/June in Year 11

    Please note that from the Academic Year 2017-18 GCSE exams only for French and Spanish will be assessed in Year 11 as follows:

    Listening paper: term 6   25%

    Reading paper:  term 6   25%

    Speaking exam: from term 5     25%

    Writing exam:   term 6    25%

Geography  

In Geography, pupils will follow the new AQA Specification. The following options are our chosen areas of study:

  • Natural Hazards
  • River Landscapes of the UK
  • Coastal Landscapes of the UK
  • Ecosystems, including Rainforest and Deserts
  • Urban Issues and Challenges
  • The Changing Economic World
  • Resource Management, focusing on Food resources.
  • Geographical Skills
  • Geographical Fieldwork

What can students expect from the course?

  •  Studying geography gives you the opportunity to travel the world via the classroom, learning about both the physical and human environment. You’ll understand how geography impacts your life every day and discover the key opportunities and challenges facing the world.
  • The Syllabus is separated into three key units, focusing on Physical Geography, Human Geography and Geographical skills.
  • Fieldwork is compulsory and you will be given the opportunity to complete an investigation in both a human and physical environments
  • Students will be given extra support in dedicated after school sessions, where students are given the ability to not only develop their subject knowledge, but also develop knowledge on exam technique and application of geographical skills.

What can Geography offer me in the future?

  • Geography allows you to develop skills that are helpful in other subject and careers, including critical thinking, using data and working as a team
  • Careers include, Sustainable engineer or landscape architect, Town planner, Environmental consultant, Conservation officer, Tourism officer and many more.

Graphics

NCFE Level 2 Certificate in Creative Studies: Graphic Design

The course is aimed at 14-16 year olds studying their Key Stage 4 curriculum who are interested in any aspect of graphic design, including sourcing ideas and design.

Each qualification focuses on an applied study of the graphic design sector and students will gain a broad understanding and knowledge of working in the sector.

The qualifications have been designed to sit alongside the requirements of core GCSE subjects and are appropriate for students who are motivated and challenged by learning through hands-on experiences and through content which is concrete and related directly to those experiences.

This Level 2 qualification is appropriate for students who are looking to develop a significant core of knowledge and understanding and apply that knowledge through a project.

What will the learner study as part of this qualification?

This qualification shows students how to:

  • research ideas and use various sources
  • use a variety of tools, materials and techniques
  • explore a range of media and materials
  • build a portfolio of ideas
  • use their knowledge of the chosen graphic design elements to produce an item in response to a brief or scenario
  • work safely and securely when creating their graphic design item.

     

    What knowledge and skills will the student develop as part of this qualification and how might these be of use and value in further studies?

    Learners will know about:

  • responding to a brief.

    They will develop skills:

  • in using different tools and equipment safely and competently
  • when experimenting with materials and techniques
  • in adapting their own ideas and responding to feedback
  • in evaluating their own work
  • in literacy, numeracy and ICT
  • that are essential for the modern workplace, such as team working; presentation skills; independent working; working to deadlines; efficient use of resources.

    Successful completion of this qualification will fulfil the entry requirements for relevant academic and vocational study post-16.

    This qualification has been mapped to Literacy, Numeracy and ICT. Students may, therefore, use evidence from this course towards the knowledge requirements of a relevant competence-based qualification.

    The knowledge and skills gained will provide a secure foundation for careers in the graphic design industry

Work as a Graphic Designer requires both a creative and a well organised mind. Clients will expect to have a professional and efficient relationship with their Graphic Designer who is, in turn, also expected to quickly grasp the business, vision and requirements of the client. This is followed by a creative process producing real or virtual outcomes to meet the client’s brief. Graphic design also covers various aspects of visual communication and presentation, using imaginative and effective designs that create and combine words, symbols, and images to convey ideas and messages.

Common uses of graphic design include identity (logos and branding), publications (magazines, newspapers and books), corporate branding, advertisements and product packaging. There are a number of specialist graphic design job roles, however there are also an enormous number of small graphic design companies where employees are often required to be able to demonstrate skills across the job roles and complete designs that can be used in a variety of media for a variety of purposes.

How it will be Assessed?

Careers in Graphic Design

 

Health & Social Care 

 

          

Health and Social Care is a three-year Level 2 BTEC qualification that is an exploration into the health and well-being of individuals. The course offers learners a chance to investigate a range of services, organisations and roles within the health, social and early year’s sectors.

Learners will be able to examine how people develop physically and investigate how different factors such as diversity and culture have an impact on that development. Our health and social care course encourages learners to develop a critical and analytical approach to problem-solving, to become effective and independent learners. The course will also help prepare learners for working in a range of different careers within health and social care.  The Health and Social Care course will also be able learners to progress on to further studies in this area.

http://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/btec-tec-awards/health-and-social-care/2017/specification-and-sample-assessments/tech-award-HSC-spec.pdf

History  

Pupils follow the new AQA GCSE specification. The following options are our chosen topics of study

  • Health and the people
  • Elizabethan England
  • Germany 1918-1945
  • Conflict and tension in Asia, 1950–1975

GCSE students develop a wide range of highly valuable skills – history is far more than just knowing ‘stuff’ about the past. It’s about critically utilizing a range of different sources, being able to put forward and defend an argument or an interpretation and to analyse and evaluate the causes and consequences of events. These are all skills which can be used as a foundation for further study of any subject in KS5 or for employment.

Pupils are extremely well supported, with tailored intervention available after school as well as peer intervention and one on one support when needed.

To support pupils outside the classroom I have developed a website that has revision resources, as well as homework and exam tasks so there is always something pupils can be doing to improve their progress within the subject. This site will expand and develop as pupils go through the course. https://clenhistory.wordpress.com/

What can History do for me and how can I use it?

History can give you the skills most employers want – whatever the job you have in mind.
It isn’t just for people who want to teach or work in museums, archaeology or conservation. History is a useful and often necessary subject for joining other careers like Accountancy, Architecture, Banking, Business Administration, Civil Service, Economists, Journalism, the Law, Management, Market Research, Personnel Work, Police Force, Publishing, the Armed Services, Social Work, TV Research, Tourism, Town Planning and many more.

ICT 

Creative Computing

ICT department in delivering CiDA (Certificate in Digital Applications) qualification for KS4 students. Creative Computing/CiDA combines IT with creative, arts-based subjects. Many technology companies now demand that employees have both highly tuned digital skillset, and a creative, ideas-driven approach. Creative Computing/CiDA developed with these roles in mind. Structure of the qualification is as follows:

Unit 1: Developing Web products (25% controlled assessment)

When surfing the web, what captures your attention?

Acting as a starting point for the qualification, this mandatory unit gives learners the knowledge and skills they need to produce attention-grabbing and interactive web products using web authoring software, multimedia assets and navigation features. The assessment is a practical computer-based examination to develop a prototype website.

Unit 3: Artwork and Imaging (75% coursework)

Whether advertising a product or enhancing digital content, images are all around us, influencing what we do and how we think. Unit 3 gives the learner skills to use artwork and imaging software to design and create effective graphic products. Learners will demonstrate their ability on a major project which will include exhibiting their work and supporting evidence in an e-portfolio.

Computer Science

Subject Overview

Computer Science is a rapidly changing and exciting discipline which underpins almost everything you can think of in society.  In a nutshell, GCSE Computer Science explores the principles of digital technology and its applications.  Students who take this course will develop programming skills in Java and understand how computers work as opposed to the Creative Computing qualification which focuses on the creation of digital products without needing to know how they are produced.  Students will be inspired and challenged by a range of computer-related topics.

Aims of the course

Students will:

  • develop computer programs to solve problems with some opportunity to work collaboratively
  • acquire and apply knowledge, technical skills and an understanding of the use of algorithms
  •  in computer programs to solve problems.
  • develop an understanding of current and emerging technologies in a range of contexts
  • acquire and apply creative and technical skills and understanding of IT in a range of contexts
  • evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions and the impact of these in society

What students study across KS4

The scope of this qualification comprises knowledge and understanding of the following:

  • Programming – algorithms, programming languages, control flow, data handling and testing
  • Programming project – design, code and test the solution to a problem using Java
  • Computing hardware – Central Processing Unit (CPU), binary logic, memory, input and output devices, secondary storage
  • Computing software – applications, operating systems, utilities and maintenance programs
  • Representation of data – units, numbers, characters, images, sound and instructions
  • Communications and networking – peer-to-peer, client-server, topologies, protocols, internet architecture, HTML and file standards

Assessment

Unit

Assessment

Weighting

Computer Systems topics - architecture, memory, storage, networks, security and environmental concerns

1 hour 30 min Examination

40%

Computational thinking, algorithms, computational logic, computer programming techniques, data representation

1 hour 30 min Examination

40%

Programming Project –
students will create solutions to computing tasks from a set of options

Approximately 20 hours
Controlled
Assessment

20%

Key skills/habits developed

Experimentation – learning computer science involves messing around with code; you have to break problems down into manageable parts and try out various options through trial and error.

Tenacity – mastering computer science or a programming language is not easy and many programmers doubt their ability; an important trait is therefore persistence and perseverance.

Mathematics – when you are programming functions and commands, you need to have a sound understanding and ability in mathematics.

Persistence – You will have to persist to overcome problems and find solutions to make your code work.

Why study this subject?

Drew Houston, founder of Dropbox, says “it’s not unlike playing a musical instrument or a sport; it starts out being very intimidating but you kind of get the hang of it over time and it’s the closest thing we have to a superpower”.  Here are some other great reasons to study it:

  • It’s engaging and fun – it gives students the opportunity to discover how computer technology works and develop programming skills.
  • It’s a great way to develop critical thinking, analysis and problem-solving skills, which can be transferred to further learning and everyday life.
  • It’s a stepping stone for higher education and employment in the field of computer science
  • Computer Science is now part of the English Baccalaureate and as such has high ‘currency’ in terms of what employers and universities are looking for.
  • •Learn how programs work and have the opportunity to code your own programs.

Italian  

     

There are several reasons why learning a language at GCSE makes a difference to your education and the opportunities you will have in your life. Here you can find ten:

  • It enhances your career opportunities in many fields (trade and commerce, design, journalism, tourism, fashion, arts, education, telecommunications) and increases your salary potential.
  • It increases your appreciation of other people and their cultures.
  • It develops your critical and creative thinking skills.
  • Knowing another language significantly improves your vocabulary, grammar and spelling in English.
  • It gives an extra edge to your education, opening your door to art, music, dance, fashion, cuisine and cinema.
  • It significantly improves your chances of being accepted to a good university.
  • It enhances your travelling experiences to Italy, France, Spain, Canada, the Caribbean. South & Central America and Africa.
  • It opens up an entire world of sporting events to enthusiasts.
  • It makes you more successful in picking up other additional languages.

    Visit the following site for more inspiration, advice and activities on the value of learning languages: http://www.languageswork.org.uk.

    The course is over three years during which students will develop the four skills of speaking, writing, reading and listening. It is assessed as follows:

    Current Year 11 for Academic Year 2016 -17:

    30% for the Speaking as a controlled assessment
    30% for the Writing as a controlled assessment
    20% for the Reading as an exam paper – May/June in Year 11
    20% for the Listening as an exam paper – May/June in Year 11

    Please note that from the Academic Year 2017-18 GCSE exams only for French and Spanish will be assessed in Year 11 as follows:

    Listening paper: term 6   25%

    Reading paper:  term 6   25%

    Speaking exam: from term 5     25%

    Writing exam:   term 6    25%

  • GCSE Italian will follow the above assessment criteria from the academic Year 2018-19

Learning for Life 

‘Learning for Life is a Subject area which is designed to support confidence in and out of the classroom; social skills; independent learning; and practical application of work related skills.  There are two streams  which offer different opportunities and skills packages.

The Certificate of Personal Effectiveness, offered by ASDAN, is designed to be undertaken in the classroom.  It offers 120 hours of project based work which must be completed to a Level 2 standard in order to gain the qualification. Students become confident in working in teams; taking control of their success; choosing and designing projects; and working independently.  They gain experience of other important academic and work skills like making a presentation, research and discussion.

The Work Placement option is designed to offer those students, who will be seeking an Apprenticeship after Year 11, an experience of work.  They will be expected to attend once a week in every school week, for a full working day.  Students have some choice in which area of employment they work, but may have to be willing to take those placements which are available. There is no qualification with this  stream and is offered to those students who find the classroom a difficult place to be.’

Mathematics  

Mathematics is the most widely used subject in the world. Every career uses some sort of Maths. More importantly, doing Maths helps the mind to reason and organise complicated situations or problems into clear, simple, and logical steps.


Mathematics is a Core subject and our aim is to ensure that we foster an understanding and appreciation of Maths so students can use their skills in their everyday lives as well as essential exam success.

We deliver an extensive curriculum including:

  • Using and Applying Skills
  • Number and Algebra
  • Shape, Space and Measure
  • Handling Data

    We use a variety of techniques to engage students in mathematics, including puzzles, challenges and games as well as traditional teaching.

    Problem solving and critical thinking strategies are embedded into the Mathematics syllabus to develop pupils’ ability to think independently. We endeavor to help our students develop a positive attitude to mathematics and to develop their understanding in a way that promotes confidence and enjoyment.

    Skills that students obtained from math:

  • The ability to identify and analyze patterns
  • Logic and critical thinking skills
  • Ability to see relationships
  • Problem solving skills

In GCSE students have the opportunity to build on the excellent foundation provided in Key Stage 3 and tackle with confidence the GCSE syllabus.

All students follow the linear program and are taught to develop both calculator and non-calculator methods and to apply their skills to real-world problems wherever possible.

In Yr 11 students are assess through three examinations of equal weighting two calculator and one non calculator exam.

The table below illustrates the topic areas covered in this qualification and the topic area weightings for the assessment of the Foundation tier and the assessment of the Higher tier.

 

Media Studies 

GCSE Media Studies is designed to allow all learners study a range of media forms in terms of a theoretical framework which consists of media language, representation, media industries and audiences. The following forms are studied in depth through applying all areas of the framework: newspapers, television, music video and online, social and participatory media. Advertising and marketing, film, video games, radio and magazines are studied in relation to selected areas of the framework.

 Aims of the course

This course is organised in terms of the two central activities:

  • thinking about the media, involving investigating media products and their various contexts and
  • creating for the media, involving planning, producing and presenting media products.

What students study across KS4

Component 1: Exploring the Media

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes  

40% of qualification

 

Section A: Exploring Media Language and Representation

This section assesses media language and representation in relation to two of the following print media forms: magazines, marketing (film posters), newspapers, or print advertisements.

Section B: Exploring Media Industries and Audiences

This section assesses two of the following media forms: film, newspapers, radio, video games.

 

Component 2: Understanding Media Forms and Products

Written examination: 1 hour 30 minutes  

30% of qualification

This component assesses all areas of the theoretical framework and contexts of the media in relation to television and music.

Section A: Television

Section B: Music (music videos and online media)

 

Component 3: Creating Media Products

Non-exam assessment  

30% of qualification

An individual media production for an intended audience in response to a choice of briefs set by WJEC, applying knowledge and understanding of media language and representation.

Why study this subject?

Many students who study Media Studies GCSE go on to study AS and A2 Media Studies or undertake college courses which focus on Media Production.  Similarly, many pursue Media degrees as a single discipline or alongside subjects such as English, Film or Theatre Studies as a joint honours degree.

Media opens up a number of different career opportunities such as:

  • TV industry
  • Publishing
  • Advertising
  • Journalism
  • Media Production
  • Radio
  • Teaching
  • IT

Music 

The arts in general, and Music in particular, attract international prestige to Britain. They are a major export earner and a significant economic sector in their own right. With the ever-increasing economic and social links occurring in Europe and further afield, it is imperative that students are given a thorough grounding in the understanding and application of Music. Every student at Thomas Aveling is given the opportunity to study an instrument of their choice, we currently offer voice, flute, piano, saxophone, clarinet, guitar, trumpet, bass and drums.

If students choose to study Music at KS4 they work towards completing the GCSE qualification in Music. The course is divided into three main sections; Composition, Performance and Listening. Pupils will complete 60% of their coursework before their written exam at the end of the course. The course is highly practical and encourages pupils to listen and perform music from 1600, right up to the modern day.

PE 

Core PE

Year 9 and 10 students have three core P.E. lessons every two weeks and year 11 have two. Once again activities are provided on a modular basis – but in Years 10 and 11 we try as much as possible to group students together who are of similar ability and we choose activities which are suited to that particular group.

Pupils are encouraged to attend extracurricular sports clubs and fixtures are arranged against other schools in the same way as for KS3.

GCSE Physical Education

Exam Board – EDEXCEL
Students can choose GCSE PE as an option and will begin the course in year 9.

3 activities are practically assessed.
Practical assessment  40%  
Written Exam     60%

Students will study and be assessed on their performance in at least the following sports (40% of total marks):

  • Football
  • Netball
  • Fitness
  • Handball
  • Athletics
  • Rounders
  • Badminton
  • Softball
  • Hockey
  • Basketball

    The criteria for the practical assessment are technical performance, tactical awareness and knowledge and application of rules.

    Students will study units of work required for the external examination at the end of year 11. Each unit is assessed using past exam papers to help students develop their required exam skills.

    Students will also have the opportunity to attend extracurricular activities to develop their practical ability and to represent the school in their chosen sports.

Photography  

KS4 GCSE Art and Design: Photography, Art and Textiles

Board: OCR

Coursework (1 unit)    60%

Exam    (1 unit)   40%

Why OCR GCSE Art and Design. Let us put you in the picture.

If you’re weighing up your GCSE options at the moment, take a minute to consider just what you might gain if you choose our Art and Design: Photography, Textiles or Art

What’s in it for me?

This GCSE is designed to bring Art and Design to life and to help you develop your artistic skills and expand your creativity, imagination and independence. What’s more, the possibilities for personal expression are endless.

How could it help with my future?

The course provides outstanding preparation for progression to A Level in Art and Design. It could lead towards a career in fine art, new media, games development or games technologies, as well as digital photography and video, and more.

What are some of the things I’ll learn?

We want this to be an inspiring GCSE that will encourage you to consider a wide range of approaches to expressing yourself through different materials, media and techniques.

It will help you gain knowledge and understanding of art, craft, design, media and technologies today and in the past, as well as in different societies and cultures. You’ll also develop an understanding of the different roles, audiences and consumers for art, craft and design. You’ll experience different work practices and look at relevant processes and equipment too.

Candidates should demonstrate an expressive and/or interpretative artistic response to the visual world. They should show understanding of conventions and genres such as portrait, landscape and movement and a range of techniques appropriate to the chosen specialism of photography, Textiles or Fine Art.

How will my work be assessed?

This GCSE has a controlled assessment unit, which will involve you in producing a portfolio of work. Controlled assessment means coursework you do in a supervised environment – which could be in your classroom or, for example, on a field trip. There’ll also be a ten-hour practical task prior to which you’ll have approximately 8 weeks preparation time. This is your examination unit which is worth 40% of your overall GCSE.

What grade will I achieve?

You will achieve a grade for each unit, from 1-9 and then an overall grade for the whole course, which will be from 1-9.

In order to succeed in the course, the completion of quality homework tasks is imperative and students are expected to meet the given deadlines. Students will be responsible for keeping their sketch books safe and up to date as they will contain the majority of evidence for assessment.

All students are strongly advised to regularly attend after school sessions to help support and enhance their achievement.

PSHE 

The main aim of the PSHE programme across the school is to raise students’ confidence and help them to develop interpersonal skills, social skills and communication skills in preparation for adult life.

Students will cover a variety of important and sensitive topics across KS3, KS4 and KS5.
E.g. drugs and alcohol; personal health; sex and relationships; personal safety; study skills; personal finance; careers and citizenship. Sometimes the topics are revisited across the Key Stages but looking at different aspects and at a deeper or more detailed level.

Students are encouraged to form and then share their views and opinions by participating in group and class discussions. They are also provided with a range of factual information within their lessons and by outside providers so that they can eventually make informed decisions for themselves.

Wherever possible students are involved in learning actively.

RE 

All students follow a Religious Studies course named Citizenship and Beliefs which looks at religious beliefs and attitudes concerning modern citizenship issues.

We actively promote important values of truth, justice and respect for all.

The course looks at some main beliefs and attitudes of world religions and encourages students to think for themselves about questions of meaning and identity.

We value the sincerely held views and backgrounds of all students and seek to help students think about and develop their own views on moral and ethical issues.

  • Religious Education promotes spirituality by discussing key questions of meaning and truth.
  • Religious Education promotes moral development through valuing diversity and exploring influences on moral choices.
  • Religious Education promotes social development through considering how beliefs lead to particular actions and concerns.

In lessons we aim to use a variety of teaching techniques and try to link religious concepts with the lives and interests of young people today.

In Key stage 4 students follow the course as Citizenship & Beliefs. In years 9 and 10 they follow the AQA Religious Studies Syllabus A which looks in year 9 at issues such as religion and relationships, religion and life issues and issues of peace and war. In year 10 they study religious ideas on crime and punishment, religion and human rights and a study of the religion of Judaism. In year 11 students have the option of taking the full GCSE and study the religion of Christianity in more depth.

Science  

In year’s 9, 10 and 11 students will build upon the foundations they laid in KS3. Students complete two GCSE’s in Science over the three years. We follow the AQA Combined Science: Trilogy specification, which develops excellent skills and knowledge and allow students to think and work in an independent manner. Students work on a range of current topics for example polymers, atomic structure, cell ultrastructure and other current topics such as developing new medicines, applications of biotechnology and stem cell research. Students are assessed through a series of written examinations at the end of year 11.

Up to date specifications and assessment materials may be found with the following link:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/science/gcse/combined-science-trilogy-8464

Spanish